Lego Space

Lego Space

Editing audio always takes 10 times as long as I expect. Audio is being edited from the conference, and cool stuff will appear tomorrow if it kills my processor. This semester I’m teaching science for pre-service elementary and early childhood teachers (translation: students who will one day teach pre-school through third grade). I also have another future middle school teacher working on a senior thesis with me. All these future teachers have my brain busy trying to find a toy for everything. My one student is actually on a mission to find Lego models for all the different space telescopes, and the folks over on BAUTForum are helping her. So far they have helped her find: Spitzer James Webb We are still looking for Hubble, Chandra, and Compton or GLAST. If...

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Carnival of Space #46

I really can’t believe we’re already on the 40s on this! This week’s carnival of space is over on Riding with Robots. Enjoy!

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To Texas, and Home Again

To Texas, and Home Again

Let me just say, I’m always looking for a good reason to go to Texas and especially the Houston area. My entire trip last week was wonderful, and the dessert in San Antonio was a special treat. After going to see Lucy Friday, Saturday was spent lazing around San Antonio’s river walk and then attending a San Antonio Astronomical Association Star Party at the Scobee Planetarium, which is next to, and much smaller than, the Temple Beth-El dome. (This led to a moment of confusion.) Once there, however, the large parking lot filled with telescopes told us we were in the right place. There were roughly 20 scopes of all types and sizes spread out with knowledgeable owners eager to explain their gear and point at a suggested object. I got to see a couple new...

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Comparitive Planetology

Comparitive Planetology

Here are summaries of a few brief stories that combine Earth data and elsewhere data to get neat understandings of other worlds 1) Carrizozo Lava Flow (image: Google): Looking at Mars, we keep finding beautify lava flows that stream across the surface and end in sprawling lobes. Pouring over images of the Earth, we find the exact same thing (image left of Carrizozo Lava flow in New Mexico). To try and understand the Mars lava flow, a group of geophysicists set off to Carrizozo to see what they could see. The talk presented by James Zimbelman started with the written notification, “This presentation has been approved for public release by White Sands Missile Range for unlimited distribution. The White Sands Missile Range Operations Security review was...

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It Rained Like Hell on Early Mars, Ted Maxwell

It Rained Like Hell on Early Mars, Ted Maxwell

When someone feels comfortable making such a pointed statement in their openning remarks, I just have to quote them and blog them. In this talk on mars historic river systems, Ted Maxwell presented a visually stunning story rich with labeled MOC images. This is a bloggers dream come true – I can actually find what he said! Scientists out there reading – If you use archive data with filenames, please include the names on the overhead! Now, all that said, I’m suddenly realizing Malin changed their interface since the last time I used it, and I can’t find images by ID. Eek! Clearly I need to talk to Emily… Anyway, back to science. Basic story: Once upon a time on Mars, during a far distant epoch no one gave a date to, it rained on Mars....

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