Planets


LPSC: Crater Carancas Event


Posted By on Mar 11, 2008

Posting out of order here. I have a ton of notes on this morning’s Moon sessions, but before piecing together pages of lunar science, I want to share something neat: Science results on Crater Carancas. This newest, smallest crater on the planet Earth was formed September 15, 2007 in Peru. The impact site is fairly near Lake Titicaca and the Bolivia border. The path of the meteor through the atmosphere was observed by numerous...

Read More

Other People Reporting at LPSC


Posted By on Mar 10, 2008

If you are on Twitter, GeoSteph is twittering about this meeting. She’s actually a planetary scientist (unlike me – I’m just a planetary science fan chick). Check her out (and feel free to add me while you’re there – starstryder)

Read More

MESSENGER at Mercury (part II)


Posted By on Mar 10, 2008

Two selected talks presented. I’m also going to float to other sessions. Craters Craters Craters – C. Chapman presenting Craters. Double-ringed craters. Craters with lumps in the middle. Craters with smooth basins in the middle. Craters overlapping craters. Mercury is, put simply, littered with craters. The come in chains. They come in clusters. They come in different periods of time. In the heavily cratered areas on...

Read More

It’s 1:30pm Monday and we’re settling into our first LPSC plenary session: The Masursky Lecture. Prior to the lecture they are handing out a series of awards, including an early career achievement award that goes to 6 students who have shown outstanding progress in their career in planetary science. This meeting is actually 30% student attendees, and these awards help pay for 6 of the best to come here and present. In...

Read More

Tau Boo Back Flips (magnetically)


Posted By on Feb 13, 2008

As some of you may know, my favorite favorite star to bring up when discussing binaries is Tau Boo B (Go ahead, say it out loud. Giggle. Join me in the giggling. Wasn’t that fun?). This little red dwarf star is the companion star to the much more famous, but no where near as fun to say, bigger Tau Boo A. Tau Boo A is a solar (sorta) twin, with similar temps (it’s a bit hotter) and a similar mass (its a bit bigger) to the...

Read More

At this point we’ve found planets in a enough places that I shouldn’t still be surprised when a neat new world is found in a neat new place. Nevertheless, I found myself awed by a new discovery of a new planet with a 3.69 year period orbiting in a close binary. This particular discovery caught my attention for two reasons. First off, the data on this object spans ~14 years – that is a lot of data to put together....

Read More