Posts made in March, 2009


Of Geologists


Posted By on Mar 24, 2009

I have decided they purposely placed all the pretty talks at the end of the data just to keep me in my chair. JAXA is currently showing off all the pretty pictures from KAGUYA and it is brain candy. Really. Go see here and here. As I watch, I’m also watching the audience and taking in the culture. I am the product of an astronomy education. I am a child of the AAS meeting. These are very different people, but I find this a...

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The Moon is Made of Minerals


Posted By on Mar 24, 2009

Here is where I admit I have never taken Geology or Organic Chemistry. This is my third time coming to LPSC and each time I come I learn there are more minerals yet to learn. Today I spent my morning sitting in on sessions involving the new data coming down from the Lunar Missions Kaguya, Chang’e-1 and Chandrayaan-1. I’ll be doing the same this afternoon, and right now I’m sitting in a session on “What does the...

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THE NASA Meeting


Posted By on Mar 23, 2009

One of the either high points or low points (emotionally) of every LPSC is the NASA meeting. This year I have some sense that this will be a good experience for all. We have a new administration, we have new NASA HQ staff, and we know a new NASA director is on the way. Life just might be good for all. The night is starting with Steph Stockman (geosteph on twitter), the nes SMD Lead for Education and Public Outreach. It’s nice to...

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Habitable Martian Pole


Posted By on Mar 23, 2009

Carol Stoker and Suzanne Young just presented a pair of presentation on the habitability of Mars. Bottomline: The Mars Phoenix Landing Site is capable of supporting life today. The also calculated a habitability index for the various sites landers have explored on Mars. If a site has a probability of supporting life greater than 50%, it is considered reasonable to go looking for life using dedicated experiments. To calculate the...

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Classifying Planets


Posted By on Mar 23, 2009

This year’s Masursky Lecture is being given by Alan Stern. Stern seriously earned my respect last year in the face of a disgruntled room of geophysicists who didn’t have the nuclear engines they needed, who’d been told that Mars was not a funding priority, and who had been saddled with manned moon plans. He handled them all with respect and then left NASA the very next week. I’m glad the world of science has...

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