Posts Tagged "AAS"


AAS Day 2: Bring It On


Posted By on Jun 3, 2008

Nancy Atkinson and I determined that yesterday we lived a life time. Press conferences, public talks, the exhibit hall, the oral sessions, the plenary sessions – It all swept over us and through our fingers as we blogged and recorded and brought to life everything that was around us. Our Ustreaming seems to be working (more or less) well. Today will be a rinse and repeat. Press Conferences here. TV Show hosted by Ustream New...

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There was sudden burst of “OH WOW” in my heart when in this morning’s press conference Steve Maran announced that he had word that LIGO had discovered a gravitational wave from the crab nebulae. I honestly have always worried if LIGO, with its ground-based nature, could overcome the instabilities of a planet covered in people, and experiencing platechtonics. To work, it has to measure slight changes in the distance a...

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Following the success of our meeting in Austin back in January, we’re planning another meetup to coincide with the St Louis AAS meeting next week. If you’re nearby, you’ll find Phil, me, Chris , Michael and a host of other astronomical types in the K-Kitchen bar from 7pm on Tuesday June 3. Come. Chat. Drink. Astronomise. Be there and/or be...

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The Explosive Universe


Posted By on Jan 9, 2007

Many things are in the pipeline for production. In the past 24 hours I have recorded numerous different interviews and tidbits with people working on supernovae, in science reporting, and astronomy education. I have so much material I’m not quite sure when I’ll find the time to edit it together, but time will be made, and Astronomy Cast will have some great new material in weeks to come. Today’s press conferences...

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Today’s round of press conference started with the story of three systems that have mutually triggered fireworks in one another’s cores. Specifically, a gravitationally bound system of three quasars has been located at a distance of roughly 10.4 billion light years (z = 2.076). This is the first such triple quasar system that has been located. So, why should any one care? Well, quasars are giant black holes in the process...

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