Getting involved! (and maybe even meet me :) )

Want to get involved in taking data? Visiting with researchers? Getting others looking up? Here are some ways: The GLOBE at Night:  Starting Monday February 25, the GLOBE at Night program is asking everyone in the world (which would include you) to go out, look up, match how many stars they see in Orion with comparison charts available online, and then report their observations through their website.   This data will be used to map the severity of light pollution around the globe. Lunar and Planetary Society Conferene: Interested in Solar System Science? Are you a Houston are Educator (formal or informal?) March 10-14 the 34th LPSC conference will be taking place in League City, TX (just outside of Houston) and on March 9 they will hold an...

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Searching for the Force

According to a new National Geographic story (as quoted in slashdot, hat top to Scott M.) “CERN’s scientists, the fine people who brought us the W and Z particles, anti-hydrogen atoms and hyperlinked porn web pages, are now hard at work building the Large Hadron Collider to discover something even cooler: the Force. Yes, that Force. Or like physicists call it, the Higgs boson, a particle that carries a field which interacts with every living or inert matter.” This is the funniest description of the search for Higgs I have so far heard.

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More politically inspired songs

This is not a discussion of politics. This is a discussion of the music and music videos inspired by politicians. Just saw this in YouTube. If you know of any other songs (we are sticking to the musical genre only!) about people actively running for president, forward and I will post. (For those who don’t get it, this is a parody of the video...

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Carnival of Space (with a British accent)

This week’s carnival jumps across the “pond” to Chris Lintott‘s self named blog. Check it out.

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Lunar Eclipse Photos

Lunar Eclipse Photos

I have to admit it: It was blisteringly cold and there were intermittent clouds and I missed the lunar eclipse. But, I still got to see it thanks to John S Gianforte of Blue Sky Observatory. He caught the images above (click for larger versions) using a Meade 127ED refractor at f/9 with a Canon 20Da DSLR. The sequence above was taken by Richard Drumm. Rich said the image was taken with a “Nikon D-70 at prime focus of an Orion Atlas 10 reflector. Totality image is a stack of 2 images (stacked by hand in PhotoShop). The little star (HIP 50370/TYC 840-1499-1 mag 8.5, 1,124 LY, non-variable binary >10” sep, 3.6 solar radii) in the totality image had to be stacked separately from the Moon as the Moon had moved slightly between images. The 2 totality...

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